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Keynote Lectures

Visual Data Science - Advancing Science through Visual Reasoning
Torsten Moeller, University of Vienna, Austria

Groups and Crowds - Detection, Tracking and Behavior Analysis of People Aggregations
Vittorio Murino, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Italy

Trends and Challenges of Augmented Reality
Dieter Schmalstieg, Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision at Graz University of Technology, Austria

Command Selection and User Expertise
Gilles Bailly, CNRS; Telecom ParisTech; University Paris-Saclay, France

 

Visual Data Science - Advancing Science through Visual Reasoning

Torsten Moeller
University of Vienna
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Torsten Möller is a professor at the University of Vienna, Austria, since 2013. Between 1999 and 2012 he served as a Computing Science faculty member at Simon Fraser University, Canada. He received his PhD in Computer and Information Science from Ohio State University in 1999 and a Vordiplom (BSc) in mathematical computer science from Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany. He is a senior member of IEEE and ACM, and a member of Eurographics. His research interests include algorithms and tools for analyzing and displaying data with principles rooted in computer graphics, image processing, visualization and human-computer interaction.

He heads the research group of Visualization and Data Analysis. He served as the appointed Vice Chair for Publications of the IEEE Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee (VGTC) between 2003 and 2012. He has served on a number of program committees and has been papers co-chair for IEEE Visualization, EuroVis, Graphics Interface, and the Workshop on Volume Graphics as well as the Visualization track of the 2007 International Symposium on Visual Computing. He has also co-organized the 2004 Workshop on Mathematical Foundations of Scientific Visualization, Computer Graphics, and Massive Data Exploration as well as the 2010 Workshop on Sampling and Reconstruction: Applications and Advances at the Banff International Research Station, Canada. He is a co-founding chair of the Symposium on Biological Data Visualization (BioVis). In 2010, he was the recipient of the NSERC DAS award. He received best paper awards from IEEE Conference on Visualization (1997), Symposium on Geometry Processing (2008), and EuroVis (2010), as well as two second best paper awards from EuroVis (2009, 2012).


Abstract
Modern science is driven by computers (computational science) and data (data-driven science). While visual analysis has always been an integral part of science, in the context of computational science and data-driven science it has gained new importance. In this talk I will demonstrate novel approaches in visualization to support the process of modeling and simulations. Especially, I will report on some of the latest approaches and challenges in modeling and reasoning with uncertainty. Visual tools for ensemble analysis, sensitivity analysis, and the cognitive challenges during decision making build the basis of an emerging field of visual data science which is becoming an essential ingredient of computational thinking.



 

 

Groups and Crowds - Detection, Tracking and Behavior Analysis of People Aggregations

Vittorio Murino
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Vittorio Murino is full professor at the University of Verona, Italy, and director of the PAVIS (Pattern Analysis and Computer Vision) department at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia. He took the Laurea degree in Electronic Engineering in 1989 and the Ph.D. in Electronic Engineering and Computer Science in 1993 at the University of Genova, Italy. He was chairman of the Department of Computer Science from 2001, year of foundation, to 2007, and coordinator of the Ph.D. program in Computer Science in the same university from 1999 to 2003. Prof. Murino is scientific responsible of several national and European projects, and evaluator of EU project proposals related to several frameworks and programs.
Currently, he is working at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Genova, Italy, leading PAVIS department involved in computer vision, machine learning, and image analysis activities. His main research interests include computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning, more specifically, statistical and probabilistic techniques for image and video processing, with applications on (human) behavior analysis and related applications such as video surveillance, biomedical imaging, and bioinformatics.
Prof. Murino is co-author of more than 300 papers published in refereed journals and international conferences, member of the technical committees of important conferences (CVPR, ICCV, ECCV, ICPR, ICIP, etc.), and guest co-editor of special issues in relevant scientific journals.
He is also member of the editorial board of Pattern Recognition, Pattern Analysis and Applications, Machine Vision & Applications, and Computer Vision and Image Understanding journals, as well as of IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics. Finally, prof. Murino is senior member of the IEEE and Fellow of the IAPR.


Abstract
Monitoring public spaces for safety and security is become quite widespread nowadays due to the thousands of cameras deployed everywhere in our cities and also indoor. In this context, the most important and sensitive "objects" to identify are the human beings, especially in social scenarios, where gatherings of people and their behavior assume a certain value to assess the ongoing situation.
In this talk, I will focus on people aggregations at several densities, addressing first the detection and tracking of groups, while also extending the analysis to their behavior/activities. Besides, a large mass of people, a crowd, is also an interesting entity to manage, especially in public events where the level of crowdness may impact in the safety of the people. A crowd cannot be considered a group with a large number of people and, depending on its density, may require different specific techniques to monitor its behavior. I will also address crowd behavior analysis issues, especially dealing with crowd "normality" as opposed to the detection and localization of "abnormalities", as well as the recognition of specific threatening events, like panic and violence.



 

 

Trends and Challenges of Augmented Reality

Dieter Schmalstieg
Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision at Graz University of Technology
Austria
 

Brief Bio

Dieter Schmalstieg is full professor and head of the Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision at Graz University of Technology, Austria. His current research interests are augmented reality, virtual reality, computer graphics, visualization and human-computer interaction. He received Dipl.-Ing. (1993), Dr. techn. (1997) and Habilitation (2001) degrees from Vienna University of Technology. He is author and co-author of over 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications, with over ten best paper awards and nominations. His organizational roles include associate editor in chief of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, member of the editorial advisory board of computers & graphics and of the Springer Virtual Reality journal, member of the steering committee of the IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality, chair of the EUROGRAPHICS working group on Virtual Environments (1999-2010), key researcher of the K-Plus Competence Center for Virtual Reality and Visualization in Vienna and key researcher of the Know-Center in Graz. In 2002, he received the START career award presented by the Austrian Science Fund. In 2012, he received the IEEE Virtual Reality technical achievement award for seminal contributions to the field of Augmented Reality. He was elected as a senior member of IEEE, as a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and as a member of the Academia Europaea. Since 2008, he is also director of the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Handheld Augmented Reality.


Abstract
Almost everybody today owns a mobile computer capable of running Augmented Reality applications. There are exiting new possibilities, for tourists, navigation, industry, medicine and entertainment. However, Augmented Reality is only as good as the information it communicates to the user. The most compelling applications of Augmented Reality require an infrastructure, which incorporates the device, the user, the environment and a cloud of online resources. This talk will discuss 20 years of experience with pioneering Augmented Reality projects and what the future may have in store for future Augmented Reality solutions.



 

 

Command Selection and User Expertise

Gilles Bailly
CNRS; Telecom ParisTech; University Paris-Saclay
France
 

Brief Bio

Gilles Bailly is researcher at the CNRS institute and Telecom ParisTech Laboratory since 2013. Previously, he was post-doctoral researcher at Cluster of Excellence of multimodal interaction (2013), Max-Planck Institute für Informatics (2012), Telekom Innovation Laboratories (2011-2012). He received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Grenoble. Gilles Bailly is author or co-author of more than 50 peer-reviewed publications. His work has been awarded the Best Paper Award and Best Paper Honorable Mention at ACM CHI five times since 2012 and one time at ACM MobileHCI (2014). Several of his works such as ShoeSense or iSkin received a lot of attention in the medias. He has served on a number of program committees such as ACM CHI or ACM ITS. 

His research is in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), focused on understanding and improving command selection, an important task in HCI. He especially focuses on the transition from novice to expert behaviors. He designs novel interaction techniques, build predictive models of performance and develop optimization methods. Applications include traditional desktop workstations, mobile devices, interactive public displays, gesture-based interaction, wearable computing, augmented reality and interactive visualization.


Abstract
The introduction of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) in 1981 played a major role in the democratization of interactive systems in office work, games, medicine, health, finance, etc. Millions of users now spend several hours per day to select commands and applications either on their desktop workstation, smartphone, tablet or wearable devices (e.g. smartwatch).

However, many users maintain suboptimal interaction techniques for months, years, or even decades, which have serious implications on productivity and satisfaction.

In this talk, I will present the main challenges of command selection as the most fundamental task in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and review the lastest advances to favor the transition from novice to expert behavior.



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